Royal Society events

The Royal Society of NSW organizes a number of events in Sydney throughout the year.  These include Ordinary General Meetings (OGMs) held on the first Wednesday of the month (there is no meeting in January).  Society business is conducted, new Fellows and Members are inducted, and reports from Council are given to the membership.  This is followed by a talk and optional dinner.  Drinks are served before the meeting.  There is a small charge to attend the meeting and talk, and to cover refreshments.  The dinner is a separate charge, and must be booked in advance.  All OGMs are open to members of the public.

The first OGM in February has speakers drawn from the Royal Society Scholarship winners, and the December OGM hears from the winner of the Jak Kelly award, before an informal Christmas party.  The April event is our black-tie Annual Dinner and Distinguished Fellow lecture.

Other events are held in collaboration with other groups, including:

  • The Four Societies lecture (with the Australian Institute of Energy, the Nuclear Panel of Engineers Australia [Sydney Division] and the Australian Nuclear Association)
  • The Forum (with the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering, the Australian Academy of Science, the Australian Academy of the Humanities and the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia)
  • The Dirac lecture (with UNSW Australia and the Australian Institute of Physics)
  • The Liversidge Medal lecture (with the Royal Australian Chemical Institute)

Royal Society of NSW News & Events

Royal Society of NSW News & Events

Annual Dinner 2017

    Hurley cropped 2
  Guests of Honour:

  His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (Ret’d)

  Governor of New South Wales and Patron of the Royal Society of New South Wales

  and Mrs Hurley

peter baume   
  Distinguished Fellow's Lecture:

  "Don't blame the unemployed"

 Hon Emeritus Professor Peter Baume AC DistFRSN

 

Award of Medals and Prizes:

Clarke Medal (Geology) Professor Simon P. Turner
Edgeworth David Medal Associate Professor  Muireann Irish
History and Philosophy of Science Medal Em Professor Roy MacLeod
James Cook Medal Professor David Cooper
Walter Burfitt Prize Professor Justin Gooding
Archibald Liversidge Research Lecture and medal Professor Justin Gooding
Poggendorff Award for plant biology and agriculture Associate Professor  Andrew Robson

Date: Wednesday May 3 2017: 6:30 for 6:45 pm
Venue: Union, University and Schools Club, 25 Bent Street, Sydney
Cost (including dinner and drinks): $125 Members, $135 Guests and Non-Members, $1,250 for a table of 10, including dinner and drinks
Dress: Black tie
Registration: https://nsw-royalsoc.currinda.com/register/event/34 
Note: places are limited
Final Date for Reservations is Friday April 28th

2017 Liversidge Lecture

Gooding Liversidge

    Sensing our World: From glucose sensors to counting single molecules and cells

    Scientia Professor Justin Gooding
    University of NSW

UNSW Scientia Professor Justin Gooding was awarded the 2017 Liversidge Medal for chemistry.

Date: Thursday, 11 May, 2017 5.30 for 6pm
Venue:   Tyree Room and Balcony, John Niland Scientia Building
Hosts:  Faculty of Science

 

Biosensors are solid state analytical devices made by integrating a biological molecule that can recognise a biomarker of interest with a signal transducer, such as an electrode or optical instrument. The classical examples of such devices are the glucose meters that have revolutionised the lives of diabetic patients, and pregnancy test kits. There is a whole family of related devices developed for uses ranging from disease diagnosis to water quality testing.
This presentation will cover the state-of-the-art research in this field, explore some of the challenges to wider adoption of such devices in daily life, and outline the work of the Smart Materials and Surfaces research group at UNSW in this area. It will then focus on advances in surface chemistry and nanotechnology that will lead to the next generation of sensors that detect single molecules and cells. Such devices not only represent the ultimate sensor in being able to detect a single thing, but will solve many challenges with existing sensor technologies. By being able to detect many single moelcules or cells, such that the devices essentially count the number of entities to be measured, they will solve the main challenges in sensors of calibration and nonspecific signals, as well as create a whole new type of sensor. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of some of our work on bringing this exciting vision of our sensing future towards a reality.

Scientia Professor Justin Gooding FAA, FISE, FRSN, FRACI, FRSN is currently an ARC Australian Laureate Fellow, the co-director of the Australian Centre for NanoMedicine and the co-director of the New South Wales Smart Sensing Network. He is also editor-in-chief of the journal ACS Sensors. He graduated with a B.Sc. (Hons) from Melbourne University before obtaining a D.Phil. from the University of Oxford and received post-doctoral training at the Institute of Biotechnology in Cambridge University. He returned to Australia in 1997 as a Vice-Chancellor’s Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). He was promoted to full professor in 2006. He was one of the recipients of a 2004 NSW Young Tall Poppy award, a 2005 Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, the 2007 RACI Lloyd Smythe Medal for Analytical Chemistry, the 2009 Eureka Prize for Scientific Research, a 2010 ARC Australian Professorial Fellow, the RACI 2011 H.G. Smith Medal for contributions to chemistry, the 2012 RACI R.H. Stokes Medal for electrochemical research, the 2012 Royal Society of Chemistry Australasian Lecturer, the 2013 NSW Science and Engineering Award for Emerging Research, the 2016 Faraday Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry Electrochemistry Division, the 2016 Biosensors and Bioelectronics Award and the 2016 Walter Burfitt Prize for Science and Archibald Liversidge Medal for Chemistry both of the Royal Society of New South Wales. He leads a research team of 40 researchers interested in surface modification and nanotechnology for biosensors, biomaterials, electron transfer and medical applications.
 

1253rd OGM and open lecture

 

Beekman

   “Are you smarter than a slime mould?”

   Professor Madeleine Beekman
   Professor of Behavioural Ecology
   University of Sydney

Date: Wednesday 7th June 2017: 6:00 for 6.30 pm AGM, 6:30 pm OGM and Open Lecture
Venue: Union, University and Schools Club, 25 Bent Street Sydney
Entry: $20 for Non-Members, $10 for Members and Associate Members of the Society, which includes a welcome drink.  Dress Code: Business
Dinner (including drinks): $80 for Members and Associate Members, $90 for Non-Members. Reservations must be made at least 2 days before.
Reservations: at:https://nsw-royalsoc.currinda.com/register/event/33
Enquiries: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone: 9431 8691
All are welcome.

In this talk we will investigate if the slime mould, a unicellular organism with no brain or central nervous system, is as smart as we are. And you may be surprised by the answer. Over the last few years the acellular slime mould, Physarum polycephalum (literally the multi-headed slime mould) has emerged as a model system for decision making. This organism, despite its simplicity, is capable of rather complex behaviour. For example, the slime mould is capable of finding the shortest path through a maze, can construct networks as efficient as those designed by humans, solve computationally difficult puzzles, makes multi-objective foraging decisions, balances its nutrient intake and even behaves irrationally. Are the slime mould’s achievements simply ‘cute’, worthy of mentioning in passing, but nothing to take too seriously? Or do they hint at the fundamental processes underlying all decision-making? This talk will address this question after reviewing the decision-making abilities of the slime mould.

Madeleine Beekman is professor of Behavioural Ecology at the University of Sydney and a Fellow of the Royal Society of NSW. She previously held prestigious research fellowships such as the Australian Research Council (ARC) Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship (2003-2012), an ARC Future Fellowship (2013-2016), and a Sydney University Senior International Research Fellowship (2006-2010). Madeleine did her PhD in at the University of Amsterdam and was a postdoctoral research at the University of Sheffield before she moved to Australia to join the University of Sydney in 2001. She has been editor of numerous scientific journals and is currently the Deputy Head of School of the School of Life and Environmental Sciences, as well as the Chair of Ecology, Evolution and Environment. Her main model organism besides the slime mould are honeybees.

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